Writing Prompt Wednesday

4643830465_8a9b98e029_b

6215695506_84682b8754_b

Talk About It: Do you cook? Where? Why? Do you like to do it? What equipment do you use?

Level 1: Write a list of what you see in the top picture. Include feelings, adjectives, and verbs. Write a list of what you see in the bottom picture. Include feelings, adjectives, and verbs. Circle the things that are the same in both lists.

Level 2: Write 3 sentences that describe the top picture. Write 3 sentences that describe the bottom picture. Write 1 sentence that says how they are similar. Write 1 sentence that says how they are different.

Level 3: Write a paragraph that describes the top picture. Write a second paragraph that describes the bottom picture. Give each paragraph a topic sentence. In each paragraph, include information about where this kitchen is, who is in it, and what resources they have available.

Creative Writing: Imagine that one of the chefs from the top picture and the woman from the bottom picture meet and have a conversation. Write at least one page of their dialog. It does not have to focus only on cooking.

Academic Writing:
Read this article from The Guardian: Can You Picture Poverty Without Humiliating The Poor.
Write an essay describing the pros and cons of using images of people in poverty in journalism about poverty. Make sure it is in your own words, even though you just read an article about it. Include a paragraph that states whether you think the pros or cons are stronger, and justify your stance. Be sure to cite the Guardian article and any other sources you use to back up your opinions, even if you don’t directly quote them in your essay.

(MLA 8 Citation)

Elliott, Chris. “Can you picture poverty without humiliating the poor?” The Guardian, 29 Nov. 2015, www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/nov/29/can-you-picture-poverty-without-humiliating-the-poor. Accessed 2 Apr. 2017.

 

Hand It In!

Hand in your answer to one of these prompts using the private form below.

I’ll email you back with two short comments: one thing you did well and one thing that needs improvement.

 

 

 

Photo Credit 1Skånska Matupplevelser on Flickr

Photo Credit 2: David Stanley on Flickr

This post appeared first at English with Emily.

Writing Prompt Wednesday

3609505059_0db05d403d_b

Talk About It: What is this place? Is it somewhere you’d like to spend time? Do you have any experience growing things?

Level 1: Write a list of all of the things you see. What season is this?

Level 2: Use the future tense and comparatives to write 5 sentences about how this garden will look in six weeks. Write 2 more sentences about how it will look in the autumn and/or winter.

Level 3: Write a paragraph describing how this garden looks in the picture. Then write a paragraph about how it will change in the next year. Give each paragraph a topic sentence. Make sure to write in chronological order, use time words, and use appropriate verb tenses to show the change over time.

Creative Writing: Write a short poem about this garden. It does not have to rhyme.
If you are stuck, try writing a haiku:
Line 1 – five syllables
Line 2 – seven syllables
Line 3 – five syllables

Academic Writing:
1. Life Sciences – write a narrative essay explaining the process of photosynthesis. If you use a source, even your biology textbook, make sure to cite it!
OR
2. General – write an argumentative essay to convince the reader that gardening is (or is not) well worth the time and effort. Be sure to include a paragraph that brings in an opposing viewpoint and then refutes it.

 

Hand It In!

Hand in your answer to one of these prompts using the private form below.

I’ll email you back with two short comments: one thing you did well and one thing that needs improvement.

 

Photo Credit: Caroline on Flickr

This post appeared first at English with Emily.

Writing Prompt Wednesday

 

15902277813_5e106afd54_b

Talk about it:

Level 1: Who is in the picture? Where are they? What are they doing? What else is in the picture?

Level 2: Write 5 sentences that describe what the children are doing. Write 2 sentences about what you think will happen next. Choose your verb tenses carefully!

Level 3: Imagine that the children in this picture are your children. Write a paragraph that explains what they are doing, if you approve, and what they should do next.

Creative Writing: Write one page of a story from the point of view of one of these children. Try to surprise the reader at least twice with the unique perspective of the child.

Academic Writing: Write a compare and contrast essay that compares this picture to one specific memory from your own childhood. You can use the block method or point-by-point. You can address three similarities, three differences, or two and one. Since this is about your personal experience, it is appropriate to use “I” in this case.

 

Hand It In!

Hand in your answer to one of these prompts using the private form below.

I’ll email you back with two short comments: one thing you did well and one thing that needs improvement.

 

Photo Credit: moonjazz on Flickr

This post appeared first at English with Emily.

Writing Prompt Wednesday

33631368531_3203617936_b

Talk about it: What kinds of foods do you like to eat? Why? Are there any foods you avoid? Why?

Level 1: What do you see in this picture? Write a list of the foods and objects, and what color they are. For example, “green lettuce.”

Level 2: Write about your favorite meal. Write at least five sentences. What is it called? What is in it? Who cooks it? When do/did you eat it? Why do you like it? How often do you eat it?

Level 3: In at least four sentences, write about two foods you recommend eating. Use modals where appropriate. Make sure to explain the reasons for your advice. Then, write at least four more sentences about two foods you recommend against eating. Again, remember to use modals and to explain why.

Creative Writing: Imagine that this picture is the cover of a novel. What would the novel be about? Write a blurb (the paragraph on the back of a book) about this imaginary book.

Academic Writing: Write an argumentative essay for or against vegetarianism. Make sure to include a paragraph that brings in an opposing viewpoint, and then refute that viewpoint. If you use any outside sources, be sure to site them!

 

Hand It In!

Hand in your answer to one of these prompts using the private form below.

I’ll email you back with two short comments: one thing you did well and one thing that needs improvement.

 

 

Photo Credit: Freestocks.org on Flickr

Writing Prompt Wednesday

14211833513_f307f7e0b2_b

Talk About It: How do you feel about rain? Does rain ever change your plans? How?

Level 1: Write what you see: nouns (things), verbs (actions), and adjectives (descriptive words).

Level 2: Write six sentences about what this person is feeling and doing right now. Use Simple Present and Present Continuous to describe the person’s actions and states. Write two more sentences about what the person is going to do when s/he gets home.

Level 3: Imagine that this is a picture of your friend. Use modals to write at least five pieces of advice for your friend.

Creative Writing: Write at least one page of a dramatic action story. Imagine that you are the photographer. Who are you? Why are you out in the rain? Who are you photographing and why? Aim for a lot of excitement in this story!

Academic Writing: Write an essay to compare and contrast the picture in this post against last week’s writing prompt picture. Organize your thoughts using either the point-by-point or block method.

 

Photo Credit陳 冠宇 on Flickr

Writing Prompt Wednesday

16751435411_70bc562321_c

Talk About It: When does spring usually come in your country? What do you like about spring? What do you usually do each spring?

Level 1: Write what you see. Write simple sentences. Use prepositions (on, in, etc.).
Example: The glasses are on the ground.

Level 2: Write five sentences about last spring (2016). Write five sentences about this spring (2016). Write five sentences about next spring (2017). Be careful of your verb tenses!

Level 3: Imagine that you took this picture. Write a story at least 10 sentences long. The story should be about the five minutes before this picture was taken.

Creative Writing: Write a poem inspired by this picture. Focus on one element to carry your theme (i.e. cat, glasses, green, etc.)

Academic Writing: Write a five-paragraph essay that argues why spring is (or isn’t) the best season. Be sure to include a paragraph that refutes your imagined opponents.

 

Photo Credit: Marina del Castell on Flickr

Writing Prompt Wednesday

6850928334_1881e869ce_b

Talk about it: Have you ever been to the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C.? If you lived nearby, would you go? Why or why not?

Level 1: What do you see? Write down the objects you see. Write down the season, time of day, and weather.

Level 2: Write down what you do not see in this picture. Write at least five full negative sentences. Simple Present or Present Continuous would both be good choices.

Level 3: This is a picture of the famous cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C. Does your country have any special trees or festivals? Write a paragraph that tells us about what they are and why they are special.

Creative Writing: Imagine that there are no people in this picture because the world has ended. Write a short post-apocalyptic story about this situation. Carefully consider who your narrator and characters are. What is next for them?

Academic Writing: 

For USA-based learners: Write a well-organized essay that describes three crucial elements of Washington D.C.’s National Cherry Blossom Festival. Here is one resource that may help. Be sure to cite your sources!

For internationally-based learners: Write a well-organized essay that describes three crucial elements of a festival from your country. If you do research for this essay, be sure to keep track of and cite your sources!

 

Photo Credit: Geoff Livingston on Flickr